Food Quotations

Food Quotations

We have gathered here some of our favorite quotations about food, baking and dessert. Let us know if you have a favorite we have not included!

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Love just doesn't sit there, like a stone, it has to be made, like bread; re-made all the time, made new. 
Ursula K. LeGuin (b. 1929), US author, The Princess

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The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. 
Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-94)

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One's own simple bread is much better than someone else's pilaf. 
Azerbaijani Proverb

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We may not be able to get certainty, but we can get probability, and half a loaf is better than no bread. 
C.S. Lewis (1898-1963)

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I feel the end approaching. Quick, bring me my dessert, coffee and liqueur. 
Brillat-Savarin's great aunt Pierette

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Never fall out with your bread and butter. 
English Proverb

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Whose bread I eat: his song I sing. 
German Proverb

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The dog wags his tail, not for you, but for your bread. 
Portuguese Proverb

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Hope is the poor man's bread. 
George Herbert (1593-1633), English metaphysical poet, "The Collar"

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To each other, we were as normal and nice as the smell of bread. We were just a family. In a family even exaggerations make perfect sense. 
John Irving (b. 1942), The Cider House Rules

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Two things only the people actually desire: bread and circuses. 
Juvenal (AD 60?-140?), Roman satirist whose works denounced corruption

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If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony. 
Fernand Point (1897-1955)

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To give life to beauty, the painter uses a whole range of colours, musicians of sounds, the cook of tastes—and it is indeed remarkable that there are seven colours, seven musical notes and seven tastes. 
Lucien Tendret (1825-1896), La Table au pays de Brillat-Savarin

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A Book of Verses undeneath the Bough, A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread—and Thou Beside me singing in the Wilderness—Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow! 
Omar Khayyam (1050?-1123)

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A crust eaten in peace is better than a banquet partaken in anxiety. 
Aesop

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If you are ever at a loss to support a flagging conversation, introduce the subject of eating. 
Leigh Hunt

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Cooking is at once one of the simplest and most gratifying of the arts, but to cook well one must love and respect food. 
Craig Claiborne

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Eating while seated makes one of large size; eating while standing makes one strong. 
Hindustani Proverb

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Bakers of bread rolls and pastry cooks will not buy grain before eleven o'clock in winter and noon in summer; bakers of large loaves will not buy grain before two o'clock. This will enable the people of the town to obtain their supply first. Bakers shall put a distinctive trademark on their loaves, and keep weights and scales in their shops, under penalty of having their licences removed. 
1635 law introduced by Cardinal Richelieu

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Talk of joy: there may be things better than beef stew and baked potatoes and home-made bread—there may be. 
David Grayson

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Everyone is kneaded out of the same dough but not baked in the same oven. 
Yiddish Proverb

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There is no love sincerer than the love of food. 
George Bernard Shaw, Irish playwright (1856-1950)

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Life is unsure, always eat your dessert first. 
Anon

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He who receives his friends and gives no personal attention to the meal which is being prepared for them, is not worthy of having friends. 
Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826), The Physiology of Taste

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An oven whose door does not shut does not bake its loaves. 
Maltese Proverb

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A strawberry blossom will not moisten dry bread. 
Ugandan Proverb

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There will be no bread from that flour. 
Polish Proverb

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Acorns were good until bread was found. 
Francis Bacon (1561-1626)

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The sky is the daily bread of the eyes. 
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)

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If this was adulthood the only improvement she could detect in her situation was that she could now eat dessert without eating her vegetables. 
Lisa AltherKinflicks, 1975

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When you have only two pennies left in the world, buy a loaf of bread with one, and a lily with the other. 
Chinese Proverb

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Beaten biscuits: This is the most laborious of cakes, and also the most unwholesome, even when made in the best manner. We do not recommend it; but there is no accounting for tastes. Children would not eat these biscuits—nor grown persons either, if they can get any other sort of bread. When living in a town where there are bakers, there is no excuse for making Maryland biscuit. Believe nobody that says they are not unwholesome. . . . Better to live on Indian cakes. 
Eliza Leslie, New Cookery Book (1857) 

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